A powerful storm is about to inundate parts of the eastern United States with heavy rain, gusty winds and coastal flooding


A powerful storm is expected to inundate parts of the eastern United States with heavy rain, gusty winds and coastal flooding Friday and Saturday, with the Gulf Coast and Southeast expected to be hit hard by thunderstorms just a day after being inundated by several tornadoes.

The local National Weather Service in Baltimore and Washington DC is calling the impending weather event, which has not been named, one of the largest in 20 years. He warned that Baltimore could be hit by four-foot coastal tidal surges, with residents given sandbags to try to protect their properties from the predicted flooding.

“One of the biggest tidal flooding events in the past 10-20 years (possibly since Hurricane Isabel in some places), is expected Friday and Saturday. Those who live along tidal coasts should be prepared for exceptional tidal flooding! the NWS tweeted Thusday. Isabel hit the area in 2003, causing $945 million in damage in Maryland and Washington and killing one person.

The agency reports that more than 20 million people are currently under weather alert as coastal flooding of two to four feet is expected to hit Baltimore and the nation’s capital, with parts of northern Virginia also under flood watch until Friday afternoon, according to the NWS.

The Baltimore Department of Transportation even handed out sandbags to city residents Friday morning until mid-afternoon, local news outlet WJZ-TV reported.

The nearby city of Annapolis, which is on the Atlantic coast, has already seen water levels rise, with a man filmed kayaking in a flooded parking lot.

Pictured: Forecasts for the powerful storm on Friday and Saturday, which is expected to inundate parts of the eastern United States with heavy rain, winds and coastal flooding

The local National Weather Service in Baltimore and Washington DC calls the impending flooding one of the largest in more than a decade in a tweet, pictured, posted Thursday

The local National Weather Service in Baltimore and Washington DC calls the impending flooding one of the largest in more than a decade in a tweet, pictured, posted Thursday

Pictured: Konrad Karandy of Annapolis, Md. places sandbags outside a restaurant in downtown Annapolis on Thursday as tidal flood water rises

Pictured: Konrad Karandy of Annapolis, Md. places sandbags outside a restaurant in downtown Annapolis on Thursday as tidal flood water rises

A cyclist rides through knee-high flooding in downtown Annapolis on Friday.  The city anticipates potential historic flood conditions in low-lying areas this Friday and Saturday

A cyclist rides through knee-high flooding in downtown Annapolis on Friday. The city anticipates potential historic flood conditions in low-lying areas this Friday and Saturday

Businesses in the area could be seen placing sandbags on Friday afternoon in a bid to protect their properties from flood damage.

Annapolis BBQ Mission Director Konrad Karandy was among those businesses that took advantage of the sandbags to prepare for flooding and extreme weather.

“We are preparing for the worst. My personal guess is four feet (of water), something like that,’ Karandy told the outlet.

New South Wales says the last time the weather was this extreme was in 2003 when Hurricane Isabel devastated the area, which claimed a total of 51 lives, gusting winds up to 168 miles per hour and $3.6 billion (2003 USD) in damages, the Washington Post reported in a 10-year retrospective in 2013.

Meanwhile, the Potomac River, which runs through Washington DC, was already experiencing minor flooding as of 1 a.m. Friday, and conditions are expected to worsen through Saturday.

Pictured: A man rides a bicycle through floodwaters in downtown Annapolis, Maryland, Friday, October 29

Pictured: A man rides a bicycle through floodwaters in downtown Annapolis, Maryland, Friday, October 29

A group of people, pictured, wade through floodwaters in downtown Annapolis, Maryland, on Friday

A group of people, pictured, wade through floodwaters in downtown Annapolis, Maryland, on Friday

A pair of friends appeared to be enjoying the extreme weather in Annapolis, but forecasters say conditions could soon turn dangerous

A pair of friends appeared to be enjoying the extreme weather in Annapolis, but forecasters say conditions could soon turn dangerous

Pictured: A street near the wharf in the city of Annapolis, Maryland, is flooded during high tide on Friday

Pictured: A street near the wharf in the city of Annapolis, Maryland, is flooded during high tide on Friday

The Severn River in Annapolis, Maryland is also expected to experience similar flooding.

Several counties are already under wind advisories, with gusts expected to reach over 60 mph.

“The destructive winds will bring down trees and power lines. Widespread power cuts are expected. Travel will be difficult, especially for high-level vehicles,” the local NWS said.

Christopher Rodriguez, Washington DC’s director of homeland security and emergency management, warned businesses in the area to have their flood insurance documents handy in anticipation of what could amount to damage costly and devastating.

Chase Sutton, pictured, of Annapolis, Maryland, kayaks down a street in downtown Annapolis on Friday

Chase Sutton, pictured, of Annapolis, Maryland, kayaks down a street in downtown Annapolis on Friday

Pictured: A woman attempts to move her parked car from flooded Union Street as tidal flooding coincides with a powerful storm in downtown Alexandria, Virginia on Friday

Pictured: A woman attempts to move her parked car from flooded Union Street as tidal flooding coincides with a powerful storm in downtown Alexandria, Virginia on Friday

The Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Memorial, pictured, located at the City Dock in historic Annapolis Md., is surrounded by water from tidal flooding Thursday

The Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Memorial, pictured, located at the City Dock in historic Annapolis Md., is surrounded by water from tidal flooding Thursday

Pictured: A group of people walk on the seawall as a man kayaks through the flooded parking lot in downtown Annapolis, Maryland, on Friday

Pictured: A group of people walk on the seawall as a man kayaks through the flooded parking lot in downtown Annapolis, Maryland, on Friday

Jay Fleming, pictured, kayaks as he surveys flooding in Annapolis on Friday, with the city anticipating potential historic tidal flood conditions in low-lying areas on Friday and Saturday

Jay Fleming, pictured, kayaks as he surveys flooding in Annapolis on Friday, with the city anticipating potential historic tidal flood conditions in low-lying areas on Friday and Saturday

“We want to make sure that our businesses that are along these coastal areas of our region, especially our town, make sure that you know where your insurance papers are because flood insurance is going to be really helpful as we recover from this event over the next 48 hours,” Rodriguez told WJZ-TV.

Schools in Hartford and Calvert counties, Maryland, previously announced they would be closed Thursday night in anticipation of flooding and extreme weather.

In the Northeast and Mid Atlantic, strong gusts of wind reaching over 30 to 40 mph are expected to hit Friday and Saturday.

And New Yorkers can expect heavy rain Friday night, with downpours expected to arrive in southern New England Friday night and Saturday, according to The Washington Post.

Parts of the Deep South are also bracing for extreme thunderstorms, just days after a swarm of localized tornadoes ripped through the region on Wednesday.

Previous Age of Empires 4 launch time: when you can play, download size, and more
Next Activist investor targets Shell