A worker at a London pharmacy selling Viagra bragged about the size of his manhood, court hears


A worker at a pharmacy that sells Viagra online has bragged about the size of his manhood and insisted his colleagues call him ‘Big D’, a court heard today.

Darshan Acharya has been accused of being a ‘frightening sexual predator’ by a former colleague who quit after being disciplined for filing a formal complaint against him.

The woman claimed Mr Acharya said his brother had inherited better genes than him before pointing between his legs, adding: ‘at least there I’m taller’.

He was also accused of groping the woman’s butt, calling another colleague a “babe” and openly talking about the type of pornography he liked to watch.

The woman said she filed a formal complaint against her colleague, but bosses at MedExpress, where they both worked, disciplined her, prompting her to quit on February 5 last year.

The same day, the woman filed a whistleblower complaint with the General Pharmaceutical Council claiming that MedExpress was reselling used Covid-19 test kits returned by customers – an allegation she strongly denies.

The woman is now suing Mr. Acharya, MedExpress and its founder and director Dwayne D’Souza, alleging she suffered sexual harassment, gender discrimination, racial discrimination, constructive dismissal and victimization as a whistleblower.

Her solicitor Joe Sykes said she was seeking a figure in the region of £50,000 for loss of earnings and injuries in her claim to the Central London Employment Tribunal.

The company, Mr. D’Souza and Mr. Acharya deny all of the woman’s claims.

A woman is suing her former colleague Darshan Acharya, her former employer MedExpress and its founder and director Dwayne D’Souza, at the Central London Employment Tribunal (pictured) alleging she suffered sexual harassment, gender discrimination, racial discrimination , constructive dismissal and victimization as a prompter

Giving evidence via video link today, the woman tearfully recounted her employment at MedExpress, where she worked as a pharmacy assistant.

She said a “horrified” member of staff told her at an office party in December 2019 about Mr Acharya’s boasting.

As he packed the orders, he allegedly told them that “his brother inherited ‘the good genes’ while he inherited the bad ones”.

The woman said: ‘He had added, pointing between his legs, ‘but at least there I’m taller’.’

Calling Mr Acharya ‘vulgar and obscene’, she said: ‘I found those words offensive and demeaning to female staff.

“Mr. Acharya’s comment bragged about his sexual ability. He hinted that female staff would be attracted to him as a result.

She claimed that Mr. Acharya deliberately approached her and invaded her personal space when he was shredding documents.

She said he told other female colleagues about his “sexual experience with a woman with weird nipples” and that he “really enjoyed watching bondage and BDSM porn”.

The woman also claimed Mr Acharya had called a co-worker “baby” and said he “wanted people to call him ‘Big D’ in further reference to his male private parts”.

She said it was November when Mr Acharya fondled her bottom, adding: ‘I felt a stroke there. I froze, then shouted across the office “What the hell is that?”

The woman claimed Mr Acharya had also harassed another colleague trying to help her put on her necklace; positioning himself beside her as she bent over to clean an under-counter refrigerator; and harass her to have lunch with him.

In her testimony, the colleague downplayed Mr. Acharya’s conduct.

She said: “I don’t think he realizes he’s inappropriate. He can seem a bit socially awkward, so it’s easy to misunderstand him.

The woman complaining against Mr Acharya told the court that when she complained about him she was disciplined by the company for ‘poor performance’.

When she resigned in February, she reported MedExpress anonymously to the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) for alleged health and safety violations.

She told the court: “The company resold used Covid-19 test kits, returned medicine and used, returned.

“The pharmacy manager asked me and the pharmacy staff to enter the returns into a spreadsheet as ‘grouped’. That done, we had to put the products back on the shelves to resell them.

“There was a significant risk of new patients being infected through resold drugs and Covid-19 test kits.

“I was concerned that the company was trying to persuade the GPhC that there was no wrongdoing.

“GPhC’s online record showed that they conducted a telephone inspection of the pharmacy following my anonymous complaint.

“They criticized the company for its practices but accepted its evidence over the phone that returned drugs were only resold if unused. I know full well that the evidence was false and I persisted in my complaint.

“I confirm that the GPhC investigation is ongoing. They take it very seriously.

On the same day the woman resigned from her job at MedExpress, she filed a whistleblower complaint with the General Pharmaceutical Council claiming the company was reselling used Covid-19 test kits returned by customers - an allegation she denies firmly

On the same day the woman resigned from her job at MedExpress, she filed a whistleblower complaint with the General Pharmaceutical Council claiming the company was reselling used Covid-19 test kits returned by customers – an allegation she denies firmly

She accused the company of violating her anonymity and privacy, as well as harassing her for her whistleblowing.

Mr Acharya has insisted he only compares himself to his brother in terms of height and height – ‘without any sexual element’ – and denies asking to be called ‘Big D’.

Victoria Lee, then the company’s human resources manager, told the court that after the formal complaint was lodged against Mr Acharya, she warned all staff not to make inappropriate sex jokes.

But she chose not to suspend Mr Acharya and told the court he was “mortified” to learn of the allegations against him.

Mr Sykes asked him: ‘That was a homing missile from a sexual predator going through the workplace, going after women and harassing them, wasn’t it?’

She replied, “He has every right to invite women to lunch.” Maybe he didn’t do it the right way, but I don’t think he’s a sexual predator.

‘I do not believe [the complainant’s] story. I find it convenient that she had to collect other people’s stories to collaborate with herself.

The hearing, scheduled to last ten days, is continuing.

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