Heavy storm tail from north floods parts of southern California – East Bay Times


The end of a violent weekend storm descended from the north on Monday and inundated parts of rain-hungry southern California.

The storm system, the result of a powerful “atmospheric river” that has targeted northern California and produced astonishing precipitation in some areas in recent days, has weakened considerably as it moves south, but has still brought much-needed humidity Monday to Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San. Bernardino counties which, like the rest of the state, are mired in a prolonged drought. National Weather Service meteorologist James Brotherton said measurable precipitation fell across southern California coasts, valleys, foothills and even deserts on Monday.

The humid weather will give way to clearer skies and a warming trend for the remainder of the week, forecasters said.

  • Jacqueline Adama entertains Leo Munoz, as she braves a puddle on her way home from Main Place Mall in Santa Ana on Monday, October 25, 2021. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • A car drives through a puddle in Santa Ana on Monday, October 25, 2021. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • A pedestrian walks down a rain-soaked street in Santa Ana where cars spray water on Monday, October 25, 2021. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Micah Overpeck, 12, returns home from school in Santa Ana, trying to avoid puddles en route on Monday, October 25, 2021. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Jacqueline Adama is sprayed with water from a passing car as she drives home from Main Place shopping mall in Santa Ana on Monday, October 25, 2021. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Two people walk with their umbrellas at Cal State University in Fullerton, Calif. On Monday, October 25, 2021 as storms moved through the area. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • A skateboarder rides in the rain at Cal State University in Fullerton, Calif. On Monday, October 25, 2021, as storms move through the area. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • A man tries to stay dry as he walks along Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena during torrential rain on Monday, October 25, 2021. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • MoShawn Moore attempts to stay dry using a borrowed umbrella while walking to a bus on Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena during torrential rain on Monday, October 25, 2021. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • MoShawn Moore attempts to stay dry using a borrowed umbrella while walking to a bus on Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena during torrential rain on Monday, October 25, 2021. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

While the storm lost some of the punch that gripped northern California over the weekend, the system has consistently produced strong winds in the Southland, with gusts reported in some areas exceeding 70 mph, and other areas with winds between 55 and 60 mph. But wind advisories that were in effect in the Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys and in the mountains of Los Angeles County were allowed to expire in the early evening.

“Winds are gusting behind the front from the west and southwest, but by tonight they should ease tonight in all areas except Corridor I-5,” according to the NWS.

“High pressure begins to form in the region on Tuesday for slightly warmer temperatures and under sunny skies,” forecasters said.

The storm system was the same that brought extremely heavy rains to parts of northern California on Sunday. As it moved south and lessened in intensity, the storm is expected to drop between half an inch and 1.5 inches of precipitation over some communities on Monday, NWS meteorologist John Dumas said. In Los Angeles County, more than 1.3 inches of precipitation fell by 6 p.m. in La Canada Flintridge and East Pasadena.

This resulted in slippery roads and local flooding, but the rain did not fall hard enough to worry about potential mudslides at the site of previous Los Angeles County wildfires, Dumas said.

Precipitation was less pronounced in Riverside and Orange counties. A total of 0.67 inches of precipitation was recorded at Coto de Caza, 0.59 inches fell in Lower Silverado Canyon and 0.43 inches fell in Anaheim Hills and Temecula, NWS meteorologist Stephanie Sullivan said. .

In San Bernardino County, more than 2 inches fell in the area around the Cajon Pass, Sullivan said. And between 0.6 and 0.7 inches fell near the scar of the El Dorado and Apple fires in the Yucaipa region, causing flash floods and falling rocks and debris to the area.

These dangers have led to a mandatory evacuation order for residents of North Bench, Forest Falls and Angelus Oaks, Cal Fire officials said on social media at 6:25 p.m. And Hwy 38 was closed between Lake Williams and Valley of the Falls Drive due to mud and debris slides, San Bernardino County Fire Department officials said in a tweet at 6:03 p.m.

So far this year, parts of the Inland Empire and Orange County have only received about half the amount of precipitation they would typically receive in a normal year, Brotherton said. . Communities in Los Angeles County received about three-quarters of the typical 1 inch of rain they would receive in October in a drought-free year; However, the heaviest rainfall in this region usually doesn’t arrive until January or February, Dumas said.

It is too early to say how much recent rains can adversely affect the state’s drought, Sullivan said. It can persist until the end of the year, as early weather models predict a drier-than-average winter.

The downpour-generating storm on Monday is expected to pass over southern California at 9 p.m. Monday, according to NWS reports. A high pressure zone will form over the region in its wake, causing clear skies and a warming trend that is expected to last from Tuesday to Thursday.

“Any rain is good, but we are in a drought for several years,” said Dumas. “This is beneficial in the short term, but not enough to completely mitigate the risk of fire as we could have highs of 82 and offshore winds returning by Thursday.”

Temperatures are expected to be between 5 and 10 degrees cooler than seasonal averages on Tuesday, according to reports from the NWS. Highs return to normal on Wednesday and will rise even more on Thursday, with readings in the 90s possible in some valleys and deserts.

Temperatures projected Tuesday, according to the NWS:

Downtown Los Angeles: 69

Fullerton: 70

Long beach: 68

Mission Viejo: 69

Red lands: 68

Riverside: 69

Saint-Bernardin: 69

Torrance: 68

Van Nuys: 72

Whittier: 69

Pasadena: 69

City News Service contributed to this report

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