Putin’s invasion troops ‘use WWI metal DARTS’: Russian shell ‘filled with inch-long arrows’


Deadly mini-darts designed to shred human flesh were used in the Russian bombardment of Bucha, residents have claimed after finding hundreds of small projectiles in their gardens.

“Darts” – pointed, inch-long, nail-like projectiles with fins at one end to make them more aerodynamic – were more commonly used in World War I than in modern warfare.

They are not technically banned by international convention, but some human rights groups have denounced their use due to their indiscriminate and imprecise nature.

“They should never be used in built-up civilian areas,” Amnesty International said.

But according to residents of Bucha, Russian shells filled with shrapnel exploded over the town as Putin’s troops prepared to withdraw from the area.

Vintage steel dartboards used in artillery as early as WW1. They were fired at Bucha, allegedly by Russian forces before their retreat

Neil Gibson, an ammunition expert with the UK-based group Fenix ​​Insights, identified the shells, saying the 122mm 3Sh1 is among the few Russian munitions that carry the projectiles.  Inside are hundreds of darts that fan out in a conical pattern for up to 300 yards

Neil Gibson, an ammunition expert with the UK-based group Fenix ​​Insights, identified the shells, saying the 122mm 3Sh1 is among the few Russian munitions that carry the projectiles. Inside are hundreds of darts that fan out in a conical pattern for up to 300 yards

The Washington Post reports that the darts had fallen on the streets of Bucha, burying themselves in cars and walls as well as simply lying on the ground.

The Washington Post reports that the darts had fallen on the streets of Bucha, burying themselves in cars and walls as well as simply lying on the ground.

The Washington Post reports that the darts fell on the streets of Bucha, burying themselves in cars and walls as well as simply lying on the ground.

“If you look closely at the ground around my house, you will find many more of them,” said Svitlana Chmut, 54, a resident of Bucha who discovered them one morning in and around her house.

She combed through the area and gathered a pile of small deadly projectiles on the morning of March 25 or 26, but there are thousands more scattered around.

They are designed to spray shrapnel in a conical pattern up to 300 yards wide, reducing infantry formations producing gunshot wounds.

But it seems like they wouldn’t be much use tactically in a civilian town like Bucha, where Ukrainian forces don’t congregate in groups in the open.

Among the Russian ammunition recovered once their forces withdrew to the Andreevka a few kilometers from Bucha were the 122mm 3Sh1 dart shells.

Neil Gibson, an ammunition expert with the UK-based group Fenix ​​Insights, identified the shells, saying the 122mm 3Sh1 is among the few Russian munitions that carry the projectiles.

Major Volodymyr Fito, spokesman for the Ukrainian Ground Forces Command, said the Ukrainian army does not use dart shells.

They have a long history, having first been used to kill people during World War I, and they were used by the United States – which calls them “Beehive” anti-personnel projectiles – in Vietnam.

Among the Russian ammunition recovered once their forces retreated to the Andreevka a few kilometers from Bucha were the 122mm 3Sh1 dart shells

Among the Russian ammunition recovered once their forces retreated to the Andreevka a few kilometers from Bucha were the 122mm 3Sh1 dart shells

Major Volodymyr Fito, spokesman for the Ukrainian Ground Forces Command, said the Ukrainian army does not use dart shells.

Major Volodymyr Fito, spokesman for the Ukrainian Ground Forces Command, said the Ukrainian army does not use dart shells.

Israel is accused of using darts in Gaza in 2014. Six dart shells were fired at the village of Khuzaa, east of Khan Younis, on July 17, according to the Palestinian Center for Human Rights .

In 2010, Israeli forces apparently decided to phase out the use of dart shells after they fired one at a Reuters cameraman, mistaking his camera for a weapon and killing eight civilians with it.

Today, the streets of Bucha, which were littered with rubble and destroyed Russian tanks just a few weeks ago, are clear again after an incredible clean-up effort by Ukrainian residents.

Volunteers have been working tirelessly to clean up areas of the city, with footage on Monday showing a spot almost unrecognizable from the footage that shocked the world earlier this month.

APRIL 3: Soldiers walk among destroyed Russian tanks and cars in Bucha, on the outskirts of kyiv

APRIL 3: Soldiers walk among destroyed Russian tanks and cars in Bucha, on the outskirts of kyiv

APRIL 6: A Ukrainian soldier stands among destroyed Russian tanks in Bucha, on the outskirts of kyiv.  The city was the scene of heavy fighting early in the war, and while Ukrainian forces destroyed several Russian tanks and other armored vehicles, the city was overrun and occupied by the Russians for about a month.

APRIL 6: A Ukrainian soldier stands among destroyed Russian tanks in Bucha, on the outskirts of kyiv. The city was the scene of heavy fighting early in the war, and while Ukrainian forces destroyed several Russian tanks and other armored vehicles, the city was overrun and occupied by the Russians for about a month.

APRIL 18: Men walk past burnt-out military APCs in a field where destroyed vehicles are brought in, as city clearing continues

APRIL 18: Men walk past burnt-out military APCs in a field where destroyed vehicles are brought in, as city clearing continues

Pictured: Vokzal'na Street in Bucha, the site of heavy fighting since Russia's invasion of Ukraine, looks unrecognizable from photographs of the town that shocked the world when published early april.  Burned-out wreckage of Russian military vehicles that lined the street were moved by workers clearing the town

Pictured: Vokzal’na Street in Bucha, the site of heavy fighting since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, looks unrecognizable from photographs of the town that shocked the world when published early april. Burned-out wreckage of Russian military vehicles that lined the street were moved by workers clearing the town

APRIL 18: Workers wearing high visibility jackets work next to a house next to a house whose roof has collapsed due to shelling.  It appears to be one of the few buildings on the street that remains at least partially intact.  The rest was reduced to rubble

APRIL 18: Workers wearing high visibility jackets work next to a house next to a house whose roof has collapsed due to shelling. It appears to be one of the few buildings on the street that remains at least partially intact. The rest was reduced to rubble

The atrocities committed by Russian forces were uncovered after the city was liberated from its occupiers, prompting international condemnation of Moscow’s actions.

Photographs from the suburban town near kyiv showed workers shoveling gravel and sweeping the heavily shelled roads that were turned into a war zone at the start of Putin’s invasion of Ukraine.

Gone are the burned-out wreckage of Russian military vehicles, much of the debris from destroyed Ukrainian homes and the bodies of slain civilians lining the streets after Kyiv forces retook the city following Russia’s brutal month-long occupation . Now the scenes of devastation have been replaced with signs of life returning.

In one image, two men wearing high visibility jackets work together to shovel debris into the bucket of an excavator. Another shows a team of residents working on the road, filling a dumpster with rubble.

Others are shown working next to a house whose roof has collapsed due to shelling. It appears to be one of the few buildings on the street that remains at least partially intact. Piles of rubble, once the homes of Bucha residents, line both sides of Vokzal’na Street – the site of many killings and much of the fighting in the suburban town.

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