Three people arrested in far-right terrorism investigation deny owning parts of 3D printed gun


Woman, two men arrested in far-right terrorism investigation deny possessing parts of 3D printed gun

  • Daniel Wright, 29, Liam Hall, 30, and Stacey Salmon, 28, appeared at the Old Bailey via video link from Yorkshire Prisons
  • They face the same charge of possessing components of a 3D printed gun for terrorist purposes
  • A fourth defendant, Samuel Whibley, 28, is charged with six offenses of incitement to terrorism and dissemination of a terrorist publication
  • The four have all pleaded not guilty to a total of 20 terrorism and firearms charges










Three people arrested in an investigation into right-wing terrorism have denied owning parts of a 3D printed gun.

Daniel Wright, Liam Hall and Stacey Salmon appeared at the Old Bailey today, all charged with terrorist offenses.

One of the charges, which all three face, is possession of components of a 3D printed firearm for terrorist purposes.

Liam Hall, 30, pictured with his girlfriend, Stacey Salmon, 28, are both charged with Possessing 3D Printed Firearm Components for Terrorist Purposes

A fourth accused, Samuel Whibley, 28, of Derwen Deg, Menai Bridge, Anglesey, is charged with six offenses of encouraging terrorism.

He is also charged with two offenses of distributing a terrorist publication.

The four were arrested in May this year at addresses in West Yorkshire, North Wales and Wiltshire.

They appeared in court via video link from Yorkshire Prisons and pleaded not guilty to a total of 20 terrorism and firearms charges.

Detective Chief Superintendent Martin Snowden, Chief of the North East Counter Terrorism Police, said after the arrests: “We understand that these arrests and police activities have caused considerable concern within our communities, especially the impact. speculation around them and ongoing investigations on social networks.

“Public safety remains our number one priority at all times. A thorough and thorough investigation led to these four people being brought before the courts. ‘

Salmon, 28, pictured, has four children with boyfriend Liam Hall, 30, and is charged with Possession of Articles for Terrorist Purposes and Possession of a Firearm

Salmon, 28, pictured, has four children with boyfriend Liam Hall, 30, and is charged with Possession of Articles for Terrorist Purposes and Possession of a Firearm

Wright, 29, of Whinfield Avenue, Keighley, West Yorkshire, is charged with an offense of disseminating a terrorist publication that encourages terrorism and of manufacturing and possessing a firearm.

He is also accused of possession of items related to terrorism and possession of a document or recording likely to be useful to a person committing an act of terrorism, contrary to Article 58 of the Terrorism Act. .

Liam Hall, 30, of Hill Top Walk, Keighley, West Yorkshire, is charged with Possession of Articles for Terrorist Purposes and Possession and Manufacturing of a Firearm.

Hall’s girlfriend Stacey Salmon, 28, of Hill Top Walk, Keighley, West Yorkshire, has four children together and is charged with Possession of Articles for Terrorist Purposes and Possession of a Firearm.

Pictured: Daniel Wright, 29, is charged with the offenses of disseminating a terrorist publication, possession of articles for terrorist purposes and gathering information contrary to section 58 of the Terrorism Act

Pictured: Daniel Wright, 29, is charged with the offenses of disseminating a terrorist publication, possession of articles for terrorist purposes and gathering information contrary to section 58 of the Terrorism Act

All of the offenses were said to have taken place between January and May of this year, before their arrests on May 1.

Wright and Hall allegedly made the weapon, according to The Sun.

After the four denied the charges, the judge, Judge Spencer, remanded them to remand.

They are due to be tried on January 11, 2022 at Sheffield Crown Court.

The dangers of 3D printed guns

There are a number of 3D printed gun models now available for free on the web.

The first fully 3D printed pistol (excluding ammo), the Liberator, is capable of killing anyone.

Prior to the Liberator, initial efforts to make plastic firearms usually exploded when attempts were made to fire bullets.

This proof of concept gun, however, has shown that it is entirely possible to make a lethal weapon out of plastic.

Since then, a number of other guns have appeared on the web.

In late 2013, a gun enthusiast from Wisconsin introduced a working firearm called the Lulz Liberator, made from under £ 15 ($ 25) of plastic, which could fire .38 caliber bullets without being damaged. .

In July, meanwhile, a Youtube user introduced “The Grizzly”, a 3D printed rifle capable of firing .22 caliber bullets.

These guns were only one shot away – the barrel had to be pulled out after each shot – but in August another gun enthusiast unveiled the Reprringer, capable of holding and firing five bullets.

The alarming rate at which technology has advanced shows just how close these weapons are to accurately imitating real weapons.

Even though Fosscod users minimize their danger, the sight of the creation of plastic guns is baffling.

And the fact that they’re plastic, not metal means they can pass through metal detectors without being picked up.

For now, however, ammunition and strikers must still be metal.

But it is possible that in the future whole weapons will be 3D printed, including ammunition.

Advertising

Previous Market size and geography could help KC in 2026 FIFA World Cup bid
Next Man ate shotgun shell before entering Alabama jail, cops say